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June 26, 2014

BBC America's 'The Musketeers': All for one and one for all

Actors did their homework by reading the novel

(Continued)

Years before he was told that he should play Athos but “I was far too young to play it. I’ve been really keen to play that character ever since,” and he enjoys the Hodges take on the character.

Burke says while Athos is the best sword fighter in the regiment, “There’s something slightly ridiculous about dueling etiquette because it’s about two people hurting each other. “

Howard Charles has based his own interpretation of Porthos on Dumas’ own half-African and half-French father who was one of Napoleon’s generals. Charles, who is Jamaican-Briton, was “was keenly aware that this was going to be a Porthos unlike any other, based on the fact that, one, I’m mixed-race and two, we weren’t going to create a fat, drunk gambler.” He used the recent Pulitzer Prize biography of Gen. Alex Dumas, “The Black Count” written by Tom Reiss, to “build my own character.”

“I often describe Porthos as a human hurricane and when I say human hurricane I mean on the inside of that hurricane, the eye of the storm,” says Charles, “But when you cross the threshold of that eye, or you cross him, or the people that he loves, then you are in a tempest of discomfort.”

Santiago Cabrera, who plays the womanizing Aramis, says for him the show has “a sense of fun and adventure of high stakes, also you know, brotherhood ... but reinvented in a new way, unique and different from any other version.”

He’s enjoying playing a character “with a sense of humor as well as being a fighter, warrior and all that. I love that sort of tongue-in-cheek sense of humor of it as well so it was different for me.”

Luke Pasqualino, as D’Artagnan, says his character has “huge appetite for justice. He lets a lot hang over his head, he holds grudges with a lot of people.”

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