The Free Press, Mankato, MN

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October 2, 2012

Colts coach Pagano diagnosed with leukemia

(Continued)

INDIANAPOLIS —

Indy officials asked fans to send cards through the team headquarters, but said Pagano could not receive flowers. He is being kept in a "protective" environment where the air is filtered and hand-washing is essential.

And until Irsay and other front-office staffers walked into the team meeting Monday, players had no idea anything was wrong.

"The goal of the treatment is to cure the disease," Cripe said, declining to discuss the survival rates for patients with this form of leukemia. "That means that he's returned to a fully functional life, the life that he worked so hard to earn and he's looking forward to leading the Colts to some Super Bowls."

Cripe said Pagano's wife, Tina, had been at his bedside each night. Irsay said she was the one who pushed him to see the doctor after noticing unusual bruising on his body.

With most players and coaches out of town over the weekend, Pagano, a father of three girls, notified Arians in a heart-breaking call Sunday.

"When Chuck called me yesterday, I was floored. I was down south at my home in Georgia and he was chatting like he always chats, and then he drops the news on me," Arians said, remembering how he struggled to drive home after the doctor told him he had cancer five years ago. "My first reaction was how is everything, how's Tina, how's the girls, is everything going to be all right?"

It was yet another blow for a team that has faced more than its share of adversity over the past decade.

Seven years ago, then coach Tony Dungy's 18-year-old son, James, was found dead in an apartment in Tampa, Fla. The death was later ruled a suicide. Dungy missed Indy's next game, then returned for the final week of the regular season. In 2006, the Colts were jolted again by the death of Reggie Wayne's brother, Rashad, in a traffic accident.

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