The Free Press, Mankato, MN

Editorials

April 5, 2014

Our View: PACT group has ministry that feeds

Thumbs up to the folks involved with PACT Ministries who for 20 years have been collecting food mostly donated from grocery stores and making sure it gets to people who are hungry.

On one Saturday each month the volunteers distribute groceries to those who need it. They don’t ask questions. Hundreds of individuals and families get wholesome food once a month from the distribution. Goodrich Construction lends them the space at its building in Mankato.

Funds are collected at the Neighborhood Thrift Store and then PACT works through another Christian organization in the cities that secures the food from grocery stores.

While those who get the food are asked to make a $3 donation to help pay transportation costs, no one is turned away. Organizers estimate recipients receive about $85 to $125 of food for their $3 donation.

PACT, which stands for People and Christ Together, was started by the Rev. Jim Dinsmore of Evangelical Covenant Church, which is now Crossview Covenant Church.

On a given Saturday, 150 families are served. The volunteers of the PACT Ministry make it happen. It’s a story of charity right out of the New Testament that we can all use as an example.

MSU students aim to please

Thumbs up to the Minnesota State University students who are teaming up once again this year on the “Big Event” service project to do volunteer work for the greater Mankato community.

Last year during the inaugural event, some 120 students signed up to do community service projects like cleaning up public places or yard work.

Unfortunately, the first Big Event last year was met with a huge snowstorm that prevented a lot of the projects from getting done. Some students took to some indoor painting projects.

This year the event is planned for April 26 and students are hoping to have more than the 28 requests for work they had last year. They’re also hoping for about 200 students and staff to sign up.

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Editorials