The Free Press, Mankato, MN

Editorials

June 11, 2013

NSA spy case begs review

Why it matters The pursuit of government surveillance must balance the protection of Americans' personal freedoms with national security

The disclosure of widespread surveillance of Americans’ phone records and of Internet data on foreigners and some Americans has created strange bedfellows among critics and defenders.

On one side, many conservative critics of the Obama administration as well as many of his supporters say the mining of phone call data — but not necessarily conversations — is a vital tool in finding patterns of possible terrorist activity that can be more deeply investigated.

On the other side, many of the administration’s critics and many Obama supporters are abhorred by a secret program that so broadly and deeply collects private citizens’ information.

The revelation that the National Security Agency collects virtually all phone communications brings a long overdue public debate about both the Bush and Obama administrations’ disregard for individual freedoms in pursuit of its security aims. And it should prompt a revisit of the Patriot Act — passed too hastily during the fearful time following 9/11. The act granted a broad range of expanded and secret government powers in the name of security.

The Bush administration abused the powers by conducting wiretaps without warrants. The NSA program overseen by Obama at least has some court oversight — but that oversight is from a secret court with the public and most of Congress unable to know what criteria are used to grant domestic surveillance or exactly what is done with the information.

The revelations raise fresh concerns about Obama’s handling of privacy and personal freedom issues, coming on the heels of disclosures that his administration has searched Associated Press journalists’ calling records and the e-mails of a Fox television reporter as part of its inquiries into leaked government information.

President Obama argues the routine collection of data on Americans, whether it has any intelligence use or not, is defensible because terrorists are a real threat. Americans, he says, should trust that the government uses internal controls to ensure Americans’ rights are not violated. Americans should be troubled that those supposed controls are secret and that they are to simply take their government’s word there won’t be abuses.

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