The Free Press, Mankato, MN

Editorials

September 23, 2013

Ban a book, see lots of action

Why it matters: Choosing reading materials is a First Amendment right worth fighting for.

Free speech advocates can’t help but get excited this time of year. Banned book week is here. It’s like an extra holiday. Part of its observance is to look at the list of books that others think you shouldn’t read and pick out what you now want to read.

The books challenged during the year as reported in the Newsletter on Intellectual Freedom are as varied as usual. From an easy-to-read version of William Shakespeare’s “Romeo and Juliet” to Stephen King’s “Different Seasons,” the works include a wide variety of reading material.

The summary of the complaints are typical of those seen every year, most relating to attempts to remove books from schools. Objectionable language, graphic sexual content, inclusion of gay lifestyles, references to suicide are among reasons listed.

But among this year’s case summaries stands out a gem. In a Chicago school authorities removed the book “Persepolis,” a graphic novel by Marjane Satrapi because of concerns about “graphic illustrations and language.” Students were to study the novel about the author’s experience growing up in Iran during the revolution.

When students found out the district banned the book, a wonderful thing happened. They got mad and they got busy. They initiated public discussion on social media, checked out all the library copies of the books, wrote blogs, sent emails, wrote articles for the school paper, contacted the author, staged protests and appeared on local media.

And they won their battle. The book was allowed back into the classroom.

This sort of action sends good shivers up the spine, knowing that today’s youth still recognize the importance of First Amendment rights, including the freedom to choose reading materials. When young people fight for their freedom to choose what they want to read, they are also learning tolerance and respect for opposing points of view.

Text Only | Photo Reprints
Editorials