The Free Press, Mankato, MN

September 13, 2013

Buddy Guy concert in Mankato on Saturday


The Mankato Free Press

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MANKATO ā€” Even at 77 years old and a legend in his own right, Buddy Guy says he is still motivated by a desire to preserve the music he helped pioneer.

"Iā€™m trying to keep the blues alive," he told Premier Guitar magazine in August. "It was created by some of the best that ever was, but has been forgotten by the big radio stations."

Guy is bringing his trademark electric blues sound to Mankato on Saturday for a concert at the Vetter Stone Amphitheater at Riverfront Park.

Guy's wild and energetic guitar play has been ranked among the most skilled ever heard ā€” he was 30th in Rolling Stone's poll of the top 100 ā€” and the recent inductee into the Blues Hall of Fame has influenced a who's who of rock and roll musicians.

In a 1985 interview, Eric Clapton said about Guy: "Buddy Guy is by far and without a doubt the best guitar player alive. ... If you see him in person, the way he plays is beyond anyone. Total freedom of spirit, I guess. He really changed the course of rock and roll blues."

Quinn Sullivan, 14-year-old guitar sensation, will open the concert that begins at 7 p.m.

Tickets are $75 (reserved) and $35 (general admission). Tickets can be purchased at the Verizon Wireless Center Ticket Office and all Ticketmaster locations. Charge by phone at 800-745-3000, or online at www.ticketmaster.com.

Review: Guy superb on 'Rhythym & Blues' "Rhythym & Blues" is a focused, hard-hitting two-CD set of 21 tracks that clocks in at just over 80 minutes total. The 77-year-old Guy gets plenty of chances to flash his prodigious guitar chops, but he does so in the context of taut, well-structured songs that don't stint on feel as they range from driving straight blues to swaggering roadhouse R&B and ballads brooding and soul-tinged. Guests are on hand, including Kid Rock, Keith Urban, and Steven Tyler, but they just complement the main attraction, whom producer Tom Hambridge supplies with songs that at times resonate with references to the singer's own life. And with "Meet Me in Chicago," there is also a welcome alternative to the well-worn Windy City anthem "Sweet Home Chicago." Nick Cristiano/The Philadelphia Inquirer