The Free Press, Mankato, MN

Health & Fitness

October 20, 2013

Study ties chemical to possible miscarriage risk

(Continued)

“It may be that women with higher BPA levels do have other risk factors” for miscarriage that might be amplified by BPA, Lathi said.

The study is not cause for alarm, but “it’s far from reassuring that BPA is safe” for such women, she said.

To minimize BPA exposure, avoid cooking or warming food in plastic because heat helps the chemical leak out, she said. Don’t leave water bottles in the sun, limit use of canned foods and avoid handling cash register receipts, which often are coated with resins that contain BPA.

“It’s impossible to avoid it completely,” Lathi said.

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