The Free Press, Mankato, MN

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June 20, 2013

House rejects farm bill, 62 Republicans vote no

Congressman Tim Walz, D-First District, voted in favor of the farm bill

WASHINGTON (AP) — The House rejected a five-year, half-trillion-dollar farm bill Thursday that would have cut $2 billion annually from food stamps and let states impose broad new work requirements on those who receive them.

Those cuts weren't deep enough for many Republicans who objected to the cost of the nearly $80 billion-a-year food stamp program, which has doubled in the past five years. The vote was 234-195 against the bill, with 62 Republicans voting against it.

The bill also suffered from lack of Democratic support necessary for the traditionally bipartisan farm bill to pass. Only 24 Democrats voted in favor of the legislation after many said the food stamp cuts could remove as many as 2 million needy recipients from the rolls. The addition of the optional state work requirements by Republican amendment just before final passage turned away many remaining Democratic votes.

Majority Leader Eric Cantor, R-Va., and No. 2 Democrat Steny Hoyer of Maryland, both of whom voted for the bill, immediately took to the House floor and blamed the other's party for the defeat.

Cantor said it was a "disappointing day" and that Democrats had been a "disappointing player."

Hoyer suggested that Republicans voted for the food stamp work requirements to tank the bill.

"What happened today is you turned a bipartisan bill, necessary for our farmers, necessary for our consumers, necessary for the people of America, that many of us would have supported, and you turned it into a partisan bill," he said.

Rep. Tim Walz, D-First District, voted in favor of the bill and said in a statement that he's "deeply disappointed" the bill did not pass, even though it's not perfect.

"Washington is broken and it's long past time for folks out here to get things done and stop viewing compromise as a dirty word ... Doing nothing only costs the government more money, increases prices at the grocery store, and puts the squeeze on middle class families."

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