The Free Press, Mankato, MN

State, national news

March 2, 2014

Minn. gay rights groups turn attention to bullying

ST. PAUL — Long before gay rights activists in Minnesota launched a successful campaign to legalize same-sex marriage, they were aiming for another high-profile goal: a state law protecting children from school bullies.

Backers of a bill dubbed the "Safe and Supportive Schools Act" think 2014 is finally their year.

OutFront Minnesota, one of the main political forces behind last year's gay marriage bill, will rally supporters Monday at the Capitol as it aims to push the bill through the state Senate after years of setbacks, including a 2009 veto by former Republican Gov. Tim Pawlenty. Supporters see a window of opportunity, with full Democratic control at the Capitol guaranteed only through the end of this year.

"I don't think we're going to see one" Republican vote in the Senate, said Sen. Scott Dibble, DFL-Minneapolis, lead Senate sponsor of the gay marriage bill and the bullying bill. The House passed the bill last May on a straight party-line vote.

The bill, which would require all Minnesota school districts to develop and enforce a plan to reduce bullying, exposes some of the same cultural divides as the gay marriage debate. Social conservatives worry some students could get labeled bullies for expressing religious views. But the legislation is also facing from interest groups representing school superintendents, school board members and rural school districts, who see the state delving deep into school policies.

"We have always supported safe environments for our children," said Gary Amoroso, a former Lakeville superintendent who now leads the Minnesota Association of School Administrators. "If a child doesn't feel safe, they're not going to be as productive. So that's not even a question. The question revolves around what is the best way to go about ensuring that safety."

The bill would require all Minnesota public schools to adopt written policies on bullying prevention and designate a staff member to implement the policy. School employees and volunteers would be trained to spot bullying and be required to "make a reasonable effort to address and resolve the prohibited conduct."

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