The Free Press, Mankato, MN

State, national news

March 12, 2013

California government raiders seize guns owners have lost right to bear

(Continued)

WASHIGTON —

"We're not contacting anybody who can legally own a gun," said John Marsh, a supervising agent who coordinates the sometimes-contentious seizures. "I got called the Antichrist the other day. Every conspiracy theory you've heard of, take that times 10."

The no-gun list is compiled by cross-referencing files on almost 1 million handgun and assault-weapon owners with databases of new criminal records and involuntary mental-health commitments. About 15 to 20 names are added each day, according to the attorney general's office.

Merely being in a database of registered gun owners and having a "disqualifying event," such as a felony conviction or restraining order, isn't sufficient evidence for a search warrant, Marsh said March 5 during raids in San Bernardino County. So the agents often must talk their way into a residence to look for weapons, he said.

At a house in Fontana, agents were looking for a gun owner with a criminal history of a sex offense, pimping, according to the attorney general's office. Marsh said that while the woman appeared to be home, they got no answer at the door. Without a warrant, the agents couldn't enter and had to leave empty- handed.

They had better luck in nearby Upland, where they seized three guns from the home of Lynette Phillips, 48, who'd been hospitalized for mental illness, and her husband, David. One gun was registered to her, two to him.

"The prohibited person can't have access to a firearm" regardless of who the registered owner is, said Michelle Gregory, a spokeswoman for the attorney general's office.

In an interview as agents inventoried the guns, Lynette Phillips said that while she'd been held involuntarily in a mental hospital in December, the nurse who admitted her had exaggerated the magnitude of her condition.

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