Seven false fire alarms in the city wednesday

Thursday, Nov. 14, 1946

Back in the day when fire alarms were posted at street corners in the city of Mankato, an apparent Halloween-season prankster thought it a good idea to pull seven alarms in the space of three hours, then stand back and watch the excitement created. Turns out it was a 12-year-old boy they arrested, but he had to wait for his parents to return to town to proceed with punishment. The last two alarms so overloaded the alarm system, it could not be determined where they came from. Fire Chief Ben Barngerter was angry. He said the actions “harassed” the fire department, and he vowed to pursue “extreme penalty.” Police said they had obtained a confession from the boy for not only the fire alarms this year, but last year around Halloween as well.

Install new yule lights

Monday, Nov. 12, 1956

“Mankato would be a gloomy looking city without Christmas Street decorations,” said Mankato Chamber of Commerce Secretary N. J. Leonard, in seeking contributions from local merchants for the new lights being installed in the city. Upgrades to the decorations had been made in previous years, and more were scheduled for the following year. Fifty new stars, at a cost of $46 each, were to be installed along both Front and Second streets. The light decorations were to be turned on the Friday after Thanksgiving, Nov. 23, in 1956.

Applications for meter maids for city of Mankato

Tuesday, Nov. 8, 1966

Meter Maids were needed, and their tasks were many. They needed to enforce parking and parking meter laws, and “assist the young, old, sick or (disabled) in crossing downtown streets on the occasion needed,” and giving directions to anyone who asked. Applicants needed to be women between 19 and 50 years old, 100 to 150 pounds, of trim appearance, and not shorter than 5-feet-2-inches. Additionally, they needed to speak and write “correct English,” needed good judgment, tact, character, courage, morality and courtesy, and above average strength and agility.

Public concern about swine flu grows

Wednesday, Nov. 24, 1976

Across the country, as cold weather encroached, people became more flu conscious and wanted information about the swine flu vaccine. In some parts of the country, phone systems crashed under the crush of calls after a Missouri telephone repairman tested positive for the virus. In Mankato, before the last day of vaccine clinics, 17,301 residents had rolled up their sleeves for the vaccine. Local officials said the clinics had been going well, except for a jacket mix-up in one situation. Tom Chaplain got his shot at Franklin School, and as he went to leave, he discovered his blue jacket with an orange lining was missing. He said he wanted it back, and the Mankato Free Press gave his phone number to achieve that goal.

 

Plane crash

Monday, Nov. 17, 1985

A St. Paul pilot ran out of gas and made an emergency landing in a field just outside of North Mankato along Highway 14. The 39-year old pilot was not injured as he landed his Cessna 150. A farmer pulled the plane back onto the highway after it had been refueled. State Patrol troopers blocked off a section of the highway to allow it to take off. The plane veered to the left, hit a road sign with its wing and spun 180 degrees before crashing into another field. Again, the pilot was uninjured, but the aircraft was destroyed. On the bright side, the pilot said he was the only person he knew who had survived two crashes in one day.

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