Once the coronavirus pandemic is behind us, it won’t be business as usual.

Thankfully, continuing to do business during this crisis has been made much easier due to technology. Many workers, particularly those over a certain age, have become more confident in using technology such as Zoom to have meetings with co-workers.

The move to using more technology to do more remote working with more flexible hours was already on the way, pushed forward by younger workers. Now that much of the workforce has become comfortable with a different style of working, more telecommuting will continue in the future.

More businesses, once reluctant to have people working outside the office, are finding that it works and has benefits, such as saving money on office space.

Doing more business via video conference also benefits the environment, reducing the number of flights needed and miles driven.

Being unexpectedly thrust into a video business world has also exposed some weaknesses that will need to be addressed.

Zoom and some other video-tech companies have admitted their privacy and security regimens were not robust enough to protect users.

The mass move online for business and school also highlights the uneven access to good high-speed internet. Too many areas, including rural Minnesota, lack good broadband infrastructure. And many low-income families can’t afford things like wireless internet, putting them at a disadvantage when it comes to working and taking classes online.

Companies large and small have also been jolted by the realization that they’ve become excessively reliant on supplies from China, a supply chain upended when COVID-19 started.

Companies will be rethinking their supply chain, looking for more diversity not just a supply chain designed to bring the cheapest supplies. Becoming dependent on cheap goods from one or a handful of countries, including ones that have no fond feelings toward America, isn’t in the country’s best interest.

There will be many more lifestyle and business changes that grow from the pandemic, from more online shopping and more damage to brick and mortar stores to more automation and redesigned work spaces in manufacturing and food processing plants.

Businesses of all size will need to be nimble and rethink their business model and processes to thrive.

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