The Free Press published some informative local history-related articles by Bryce Stenzel, Brian Arola and Trey Mews over the past week or so. Positive contrasts from contemporary statewide and national politically correct movements to smother history by removing century old namesakes from iconic lakes and city parks and taking down statutes of some founding fathers, all while disregarding their overall positive contributions and the context of the era during which they lived.

And on a smaller politically correct scale even a venerable game, dodgeball, has its academic theorist detractors.

Dodgeball helps kids develop skills in throwing, catching, moving, teamwork and others useful well into adulthood. At the same time, they have fun.

Many of us remember dodgeball as a game we played in middle school physical education class. But did you know there is a 55-member World Dodgeball Federation, a Dodgeball World Cup, a U.S. Dodgeball Team and recreational dodgeball leagues around the country?

Yet a recent report by The Canadian Society for the Study of Education at the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences has decided that dodgeball is not merely somewhat dangerous, it is a tool designed to teach children an "unethical system of oppression" that "legalizes bullying."

Did they overthink this, as some experts are prone to do, or did they exercise shallow thinking this time?

I think it obvious the game itself is not the problem. Kids with the intent to bully, rather than compete to win within the rules of any game, can be identified and dealt with individually by the teacher.

And bullying in our K-12 schools, including with words and on social media, is unacceptable period.

Bob Jentges

North Mankato

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